Beadboard Panels Give a Shortcut to a Classic Style

Beadboard wainscoting has a classic look that never goes out of fashion. Conventional tongue and groove beadboard may be significant chore to put in, but you can get a similar appearance with beaded hardboard boards, and the practice is comparatively straightforward.

Beaded hardboard paneling is an engineered wood product, generally made from MDF (medium density fiberboard) or a ecofriendly hardboard, also comes in a number of finishes. My loved ones and I gave these panels a shot in our little bathroom for a classic decorative finish that will safeguard our bathroom walls from tear and wear.

Meg Padgett

We chose Georgia-Pacific’s True Bead ready-to-paint 4-by-8 foot panels. You can also find beadboard kits which include paneling, baseboard and chair rail trim, but we created a custom beadboard/board and batten treatment with Engineered timber, MDF and casing.

Note: Feel free to replace any all-wood material for MDF. Wood generally holds up better in a damp environment like a bathroom, although we’ve never noticed any issues with our MDF.

Meg Padgett

Tools and Stuff:

Beadboard MDF paneling (comes in 8-foot-wide sheets)
Grade and measuring tape
Chalk line
Construction adhesive (such as Liquid Nails)
11/2-inch finishing nails or brad nails
Hammer or finishing nail gun
Nail set
Jigsaw
Handsaw, table saw or circular saw
Miter saw or miter box/hand saw
1- by 6-inch primed whitewood
11/16-inch by 31/2-inch MDF (used for backer board)
1- by 2-inch primed whitewood
9/16- by two 1/2-inch MDF (used for battens)
3-inch decorative fiberboard casing
Paintable caulk (such as Dap 3.0) and a caulking gun
Semigloss interior paint

Meg Padgett

Ready the room for setup by carefully removing all baseboard trim so that it can be reused. Eliminate all socket and switch hardware and covers from the walls. Eliminate the toilet if needed. Leave any window trim.

If you would like to upgrade the wall paint, do this prior to setup. Paint the wall down into a couple inches lower than the beadboard’s finished height.

When choosing your panels, pay proper attention to the status of each panel and read the manufacturer’s directions on the back of the panel for proper setup.

Note: Like all wood products, fluctuations in temperature and humidity may lead to hardboard paneling to contract and expand slightly. Before installation, stand the panels long borders in the area for at least 48 hours in order that they can adapt to the existing room conditions.

Meg Padgett

Measure from the floor to a desired height (beadboard is usually installed 33 to 48 inches ) and add
⅛ inch to the height to allow for thermal growth. Mark your height and use a level and pencil or a chalk line to mark a line.

Meg Padgett

Cut your panels to height using a handsaw, table saw or circular saw. Cut the panels up if using a handsaw and confront if using power tools. Make a detailed guide for any cutouts, allowing for a 3/16-inch gap around window trim and a 1/16-inch gap when linking bits. Use a jigsaw to cut holes for sockets or detailed cuts, such as around windows. Be sure to follow the spacing pattern of the beads in the beadboard paneling when joining two pieces together.

Dry fit the paneling into the wall first and make any alterations necessary. Subsequently apply construction adhesive to the back of the plank about 1 inch around the outside edge and in a squiggly line layout in the middle. Put the panel in place and use shims to be sure the panel is level.

Hint: For cuts around sockets, draw around the socket with chalk or pencil. Place the back side of the panel against the wall and contrary to the socket. The chalk outline will move to the back of the panel, which makes you a guide on your cutout.

Meg Padgett

Firmly press on the paneling against the wall. While the glue is drying, fasten the paneling in place with a couple nails. I prefer using a finishing nail gun for fast and easy nailing. If you’re using a hammer, drill pilot holes for the finishing nails with a 1/16-inch drill bit first, to prevent damaging the board.

Meg Padgett

Once the paneling is in place, complete it with trim. Attach the 51/2-inch baseboard. Use a level and shims to make sure the board is level. Utilize a nailing gun or hammer and nails to secure the baseboard into position.

Meg Padgett

Next attach the backer board to the top of the beadboard, once more making sure the board is level. For corners use a miter saw or miter box to reduce 45-degree angles on the ends that match in the corner. You might also use the miter saw or box for a more finished look on the ends.

Meg Padgett

Install the vertical battens. The spacing of the battens is up to personal preference, but we placed ours roughly 13 inches apart.

Hint: It’s more important to make certain the battens run parallel with the beads in the beadboard than they are plumb. If you’re lucky and your walls are level and straight, you should be able to attain both.

Meg Padgett

Nail the casing into the backer board, making sure the shell is flush with the surface of the backer. As opposed to nailing into the cap of the MDF trim, which may lead to dividing, apply construction adhesive to fasten the remaining piece into position.

Meg Padgett

Together with the beadboard and trim in place, the wall treatment is ready for any finishing touches.

Meg Padgett

Apply white paintable sealant to any nail holes, gaps or places where trim meets trim. After the sealant has dried, paint with easy-to-clean semigloss paint.

Meg Padgett

This upgraded take on the classic beadboard wall treatment has been the perfect upgrade to give our little cabin bathroom some character that fits our house’s style.

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Rooms Delight at 2012 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

From the tranquil oasis of a blue, white and green living room into a “Black, White, and Red All Over” bedroom to a sofa with an indoor swing, Apartment 2102 in the Kips Bay Decorator Show House (one of 2 flats in the showcase) was full of surprises. Come on along as we begin our excursion in the warm and welcoming foyer.

See Apartment 2101

Rikki Snyder

Timothy Miller termed his design for the foyer of Apartment 2102 “Making an Entrance,” for obvious reasons, but also as this is his first time working with all the display home. He extended the foyer up the stairs to give people a feeling of flow and connection to the rest of the living spaces.

Rikki Snyder

To the right of the entrance, the Hudson River is visible via a wall of windows, also it had a direct influence on Susan Zises Green’s design for the living room. “The outside and the water motivated all of the color options,” she states. “And the light is intoxicating.”

Rikki Snyder

The living room flows into the dining room, which Patrik Lönn envisioned as a room for supper. He was motivated by the furniture designer Carl Malmsten.

The table is set with things from Hermès.

Rikki Snyder

James Rixner designed an open living room and kitchen area. He notes that the inspiration for his design began with the Nocturne area rug from Orley Shabahang. Greens — in the grass cloth and also the metallic-glazed linen draperies from Osborne and Little — are a soothing contrast with the white leather upholstery.

Rikki Snyder

The kitchen is totally open to the family room and includes a similar colour palette. The white counters connect to the adjoining room’s white leather upholstery.

Rikki Snyder

A door from the kitchen leads out to a 3,000-square-foot terrace, designed by Gunn Landscape Architecture and Vert Gardens, that has views looking south and west. “I really like the simplicity of this aesthetic of a boccie court, and in addition, it functions as a social and fun gathering spot,” says Alec Gunn.

Rikki Snyder

This writing room “is a painted fantasy,” states Chuck Fischer, who is an artist and muralist. It was motivated by the chinoiserie paintings of 19th-century artist and designer Jean-Baptiste Pillement. The 1950s lamp is out of Alan Moss.

Rikki Snyder

The window is framed by a trompe l’oeil valance that encircles a Hunter Douglas colour.

Rikki Snyder

The “Black, White, and Red All Over” bedroom, by Charles Pavarini, features butterflies that “signify the kids of the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club and their development as fully developed individuals flying out to the world.”

Bed: habit, Pavarini; bedside table lamps: Modulightor; mattress linens: habit, Casa del Bianco; mirror: Mirrors by Jordan

Rikki Snyder

A corner of Pavarini’s bedroom features a classic Valentine Sofa from actor-turned-interior-designer William Haines that is available through Profiles. The ebonized walnut dresser is from Craig Van Den Brulle.

Rikki Snyder

A eclectic wall composed of organic LEDs — it senses your body as you approach it is in the entry to Pavarini’s bedroom. “Lighting in the next decade is going to take a great twist,” he states. “There’ll likely be fabrics and wall coverings that are going to be lit. You will not be turning to a lamp; you will be turning to a lampshade.”

Rikki Snyder

A indoor swing having a view of the Hudson River is not something you see daily. Shawn Henderson definitely had some fun putting together this lounge.

The chaise is Henderson’s design.

Rikki Snyder

This “Extra Sensory Child’s Room” from Laura Bohn includes a space-saving unit out of Resource Furniture that converts from a desk into a twin mattress — ideal for a city apartment. The walls have been painted Bohn’s signature high-gloss chartreuse from Benjamin Moore.

Round shag rug: Edward Fields

Rikki Snyder

Upstairs the master bedroom has been designed by Etienne Coffinier and Ed Ku of Coffinier Ku Design. They have been motivated by a new collection of fabrics such as Missoni Home in Stark. The bed includes a headboard trimmed with white leather and a velvet Missoni Home chevron in the middle.

Over the mattress, Coffinier and Ku designed a piece of art “based on Japanese clouds, to give a feeling of peace as you get in bed,” Ku says.

Lamps: glass cylinders, Blanche Field

Rikki Snyder

This corner of the master bedroom includes armchairs designed by Coffinier and Ku that are upholstered in a striped Missoni fabric “that has a waterfall effect with the chair cushion,” notes the organization’s description. They also designed the high-gloss walnut and orange lacquer audio-visual cabinet.

“We played character,” Ku says. In addition to the clouds over the bed, there’s a sheep in the style of artist Francois Xavier Lalanne out of Demisch Danant and forged wooden mushrooms from Lars Bolander.

Rikki Snyder

Designer Alexander Doherty’s belief that real people live in real chambers was the jumping-off stage for his “Collector’s Bedroom.” He made the room for someone he’s known for years who is a collector of art by both English and American painters in the 1950s and ’60s.

Daybed: fabricated and upholstered by Zelaya Interiors; daybed cushions and linen/silk fabric: p Le Cuona; art: all from private collections

Rikki Snyder

“The Cabana,” by Scott Sanders, provides a refreshingly bright burst of colour. His choice of the grass-cloth covering on the walls is all about bringing the outside in. It’s Named Split Pea, and it’s by Philip Jeffries.

More eye-popping layouts in the event:
Two Apartments Enthrall in 2012 Kips Bay Show House

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Historical Modern Chicago Makeover

To get a neighborhood family with four kids, this 19th-century Queen Anne-style home in Chicago’s favorite Lincoln Park neighborhood was the perfect place to settle. A previous remodel had covered a lot of the original details with glitzy faux finishing, but the bones of their house were all beautiful.

The clients hired Jean Dufresne and his staff at SPACE Architects + Planners and inner designer Julia Edelmann of Buckingham Interiors to reveal historic detailing and give the home a sleek contemporary look. The result is a beautiful blend of traditional and modern styles that reflects the homeowners’ family-centric way of life. “They never wanted to’maintain’ or impress anyone,” says Dufresne. “It was all about family.”

SPACE Architects + Planners

The colours and materials were selected in a calm palette that will feel sophisticated but modern. The colours are muted but still pop out from the crisp white trim to draw attention to the unique period details.

Artistic light fixtures and the blank lines of mid-century furniture contrasts with the more conventional structure of the house for a unexpected and beautiful aesthetic. The unique chandelier is a vintage piece that Edelmann located from a demolished St. Louis Hotel.

Chairs: Vintage Italian, Sarlo
Table: Custom Design by Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID

SPACE Architects + Planners

This specific road in Lincoln Park has many older homes, very similar to this one. Some have been restored and a few have been split up into flats.

Throughout the remodel, Dufresne and his staff needed to look at the house’s neighbors and how near this house was to additional buildings. Dufresne created privacy screens on the second floor deck, adding tall fencing on the east side. Netting installed at the fencing keeps the children’s balls and toys from getting into neighbors’ yards.

SPACE Architects + Planners

Edelmann had worked for the couple before. “The homeowners prefer to keep things clean and glossy so that there’s not lots of fluff cluttering their home,” she says.

They kept the gorgeous original hardwood floors — a white walnut with an ebony and walnut stain. The unique light fixture at the entryway is constructed from molded corrugated cardboard.

Lighting fixture: Gray Pants at Seattle
Tile: Slate, Materials Marketing

SPACE Architects + Planners

An original stairway contributes to another levels of this home comprising five bedrooms and five and half baths.

Lucite console: CB2
Mirror: SGGrand

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

The living room has enough seating for the entire family, such as four vintage cherry-red leather chairs the clients owned and a little reupholstered sofa. A large bay window enables a clear perspective and tons of natural lighting.

Sofa: upholstered in Zinc cloth

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

Durable fabrics in neutral colours and a sparse layout helps to keep the room kid-friendly. “There are never a lot of bits in each room, so there’s play area. Those kids love to play together and have friends over all of the time,” says Edelmann.

Gray sectional: Custom layout Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID
Coffee table: Etsy
Rug: Atelier Lapchi

SPACE Architects + Planners

The whitewashed cabinet in the kitchen is a favourite piece. This find has a soft, beachy feel that was perfect to show the clients’ collection of pottery and sculpture. The rustic appearance contrasts with the sleek and modern kitchen.

This breakfast nook is a well-used region of the home. It has space for the kids to eat while morning light floods the room through big corner windows.

Chandelier: Robert Candelaria
Table: Crate & Barrel
Chairs: Lizz Chairs
Armoire: Jayson Home and Garden

Next: The kitchen before renovation

Before Photo

BEFORE: The initial kitchen felt far too little, had no flow and did not offer enough storage for the big family. Dufresne and his team opened the distance and enlarged the island and countertop.

The original home had numerous code violations, and also the team needed to go about fixing. Another exit was added to every degree, and many baths were reworked to get rid of awkward bumps and soffits

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER: The dark materials in the modern kitchen keep the room appearing clean, even if leftover crumbs litter the island countertop. The kitchen cabinetry is made out of wenge wood and charcoal grey acrylic.

Pendants: Vintage in Uber Modern, Chicago
Barstools: Design Within Reach
Countertop: Marble
Island countertop: Bitto Solid Surface

SPACE Architects + Planners

Dufresne loved designing the built-ins — especially the boys’ bunk beds. “The oldest boy wasn’t too happy to learn he would need to share a room with his little brother,” Dufresne says. “But he told me it was okay after he saw his new bunk bed! This made my day”

Bedding: Custom layout Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

The master bedroom performs the same grey tones in the rest of the home, however the grasscloth wallpaper adds a twist spin. The bedframe was repainted in gray grey, upgrading its traditional style.

Wall Treatment: Phillip Jeffries Grasscloth
Paint on mattress frame: Wall Street, C2 Paint

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

A little seating area at the conclusion of the room is the best spot to sit with a cup of coffee and a fantastic book on Sunday mornings. Dark wood shelving holds books and other collected bits and pieces for a built-in art screen.

Chairs: Vladimir Kagan
Chandelier: Vintage, Lincoln Antiques Mall

Next: A snapshot of this master bath before the renovation

Before Photo

BEFORE. Dufresne estimates this house was redone at some stage in the 1980s. When they first encountered this bathroom, it felt dark and restricted. All traces of the house’s original history was removed.

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER. The master bathroom is one of Dufresne’s favourite rooms in the house. “I love the freestanding bathtub — it is such a hot and tender shape,” he says. “The entire room is sun-drenched and calm.” The contrasting floor and ceiling tiles at the walk-in steam shower add depth and dimension to the otherwise all-white area.

Floor tile: Calacatta Oro, Materials Marketing
Inlet floor tile: Vintage Glass Winter Sky Luster, Walker Zanger
Wall tile: Calacatta Oro
Bathtub: Duravit

Before Photo

BEFORE. Before renovation, the back side of the house still had a more conventional appearance, and did not have quite enough outside space for your household.

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER. Dufrense and his team had a good deal of fun refinishing the exterior and designing the rear addition of the house. The contrast between the modern back and the historic front is the best instance of the client’s unique style. A garage on one side of this construction creates a barrier between the house and an alleyway, making a natural exterior spot for the children to play.

Photography by Eric Hausman

More Tours:
A Brooklyn Landmark Returns to Glory

Brooklyn Townhouse Full of Light

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Updated Federal Style at Massachusetts

This brick-front Federal-style dwelling built in 1789 unites the quintessential elegance of a classic home with modern upgrades in a charming country setting. An addition and renovations during Jillian and Tom’s house a good example of successful compromise, combining modern and classic styles while following the city’s strict historic architectural principles.

The home is in the heart of the historic district of Lincoln, Mass., about 20 minutes from Boston. The household of three started the one-year renovation procedure with a desire to make a real indoor-outdoor relationship with surrounding pastoral and conservation land. Their architect, Carol Marsh of Helios Design Group, states, “It was a fantastic puzzle to marry the historic aesthetics of the outside with the customer’s desire for a contemporary interior.”

at a Glance
Who lives here: Tom, Jillian, their tween daughter and two black Labrador retrievers Pudgie and Louie
Location: Lincoln, Massachusetts
Size: 5,200 square feet; 4 bedrooms, two offices, 5 baths and 4 fireplaces
Architects: Carol Marsh and Chris Hosford of Helios Design Group
Contractor: Kevin Cradock of Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

The big, open kitchen/family room addition at the rear of the house looks through a wall of windows onto two acres of lush property. Throughout the house, windows have been added and rooms created to take advantage of the views.

The kitchen has been where the side and main entrance foyer is now. The Caesarstone quartz countertop is 10.5 feet long by 8 feet deep at the deepest point. The curved form and graduated dimensions is reminiscent of the 1950s; Jillian calls it “the grand piano.” The custom-made cabinets are curled maple and the moldings are fir. For durability, Sant Agostino Travertino Avorio 12 inch-by-24-inch porcelain tile has been chosen for the family room and kitchen flooring.

Appliances: Electrolux Icon oven, Thermador 5 burner cooktop
Sconce lighting: Zaneen Dau out of Nina’s Lighting
Island chandelier: Harco-Loor Tiara out of Chimera Lighting
Cabinetry: Kevin Cradock Woodworking
Tile floor: Roma Tile in Watertown, MA

Windows: Loewen
Paint: Benjamin Moore, Pearl;
Benjamin Moore, Sweet Butter

Mary Prince Photography

Architect Marsh stands in the remodeled kitchen with Pudgie. The kitchen opens into the family room on the right, and 2 bedrooms and a deck are located just outside this field. The new area added about 650 square feet to the home.

Mary Prince Photography

The principal entrance is on the side of the house and opens into a large foyer. The entryway floors is Southern yellow pine and stained to match the antique pine elsewhere.

Mary Prince Photography

Here is the view in the kitchen/family space to the principal entrance. The door on the left leads to a patio, the second to a complete bath and the next to a mudroom.

Mary Prince Photography

This tub off the foyer sits at which there was once a family room on top of a brick patio. The counter is cut from Bubinga African Rosewood tree, along with the mirror frame is made of the excess wood. Both were designed to link the house to the outside.

Countertop: Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

This staircase and window, painted in high gloss white, replaced a dark, narrow-walled staircase accessible from the kitchen.

The Bocci pendant chandelier, such as most of those light fixtures in the home, is a reflection of Jillian’s preference for contemporary design components.

Mary Prince Photography

The kitchen opens into a Queen Anne-style dining room added in 1900 full with a fireplace, window seat and built in china cabinets.

Mary Prince Photography

The dining room sconces are Agatha by Hèmèra. The built in china cabinets on both sides of the doors into the kitchen have been reduced in depth to make extra space for kitchen drawers.

Jillian’s grandma’s black walnut dining room table is paired with chairs by Thos. Moser. The breakfront was purchased on Craigslist. Original sliding glass and wood pocket doors into the left lead into the living room.

Paint: Benjamin Moore, Sweet Pink C2
Lighting: Chimera
Chairs: Thos. Moser

Mary Prince Photography

This hall in the kitchen into the front door comes alive with an oil painting by Sandy Belock-Phippen. Tom’s office is on the right via original double wood doors. The room entrance is on the left.

Mary Prince Photography

A butler’s pantry with a half bath is at the end of the hall.

Cabinets: Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

Tom’s office will be on the left and the room is on the right of the entrance staircase.

Mary Prince Photography

The first front door faces the front lawn and yard.

Mary Prince Photography

Paint: Benjamin Moore Constellation Aura Paint in Pearl

Mary Prince Photography

The first living room is directly across from Tom’s workplace and is the point where the family watches television.

Pudgie rests in Tom’s office. In the front of the fireplace is driftwood out of Martha’s Vineyard. The contemporary leaf motif on the drapes pay tribute to character.

Paint: Sweet Steak by Benjamin Moore

Mary Prince Photography

Jillian’s office/studio is filled with light and stunning views of the Lincoln Center Historic District. The late 1970s teak Danish desk, the easel and the Italian leather swivel chairs in tomato red make this space a relaxing retreat for painting, work and research.

Ban seats: Calia Italia
Drawers: Ikea

Mary Prince Photography

A late addition to the house from the 1970s, the master bedroom features excellent views of the backyard and side. This chamber is serenely supplied with little more than a bed, side tables, a television and a rug on the fir wood flooring. The bright blue walls as well as the perspectives outside the large windows create visual effect. A single first painting hangs on the wall. Just beyond the door is a big walk-in cupboard with skylights and a window.

Paint: English Lavender by Benjamin Moore
Windows: Pella Architect Series

Mary Prince Photography

The homeowners enjoy lounging in the big soaking tub and appreciating the view outdoors. Helios Design set designed the oversize shower and custom cabinetry. The 12-inch-by-12-inch floor tiles are Glassos and therefore are slip-resistant. Rosewood veneer cabinets provide plenty of storage and comprise big pullouts on both sides of the shower.

Cabinetry: Kevin Cradock Woodworking
Tile dloor: Roma Tile in Watertown, MA
Tub surround and vanity counter: Caesar Stone
Shower tile: Sicis Zinnia 3 tile out of Ideal Tile

Mary Prince Photography

This original second floor bedroom is located at the front of the house and includes a fireplace mantel with first pine molding. The dolls, a recent gift from a relative, create an eye catching display.

Paint: Van Alen Green by Benjamin Moore Historic Collection

Mary Prince Photography

A hallway bath is done entirely in travertine tile with a cherry wood vanity. It’s a large glassed-in shower stall. A big window flooding the space with natural light, providing scenic views of the outside.

Vanity: Exeter Cabinet Company, 12 Kingston Rd, Exeter, NH 03833, -LRB-603-RRB- 778-8113
Tile: United Tile America
Faucet: Grohe
Trim paint: Cloud whitened by Benjamin Moore

Mary Prince Photography

The daughter’s room, dubbed “The Princess Room,” combines the old with the new. The classic six-board torso was a Craigslist find; along with the wallpaper mural came from muralsyourway.com.

Furniture (Desk, Bureau, Side tables): Ikea Malm
Mural: Murals Your Way
Paint: C2 in Kiwi
Furry bean bag chair: Pottery Barn Teen

Mary Prince Photography

The view in the road of this historic 1789 brick front Federal home belies the contemporary components within.

Helios Design Group

It is possible to see the outside of the contemporary, 650-square foot addition on the rear of the home.

Helios Design Group

More:
Nostalgic Family Home in Upstate New York
A Home Full of History and Surprise
Northwest Home with a Mountain View

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Guest Picks: 20 Rugs from Around the World

Cabinets can perform more than warm up the flooring of your inside; they can be a cultural statement as well. Through unique rugs, you can be transported from Morocco into the Orient with only 1 step. Here are some amazing rugs from all over the globe that are sure to assist you bring color, pattern and ethnic style to your house. — Jeanine from AphroChic

Amadi Carpets

Re-Woven Turkish Rug

You can opt for big pops of color with this up-cycled Turkish flooring covering. The coolest part is that it is made from the re-dyed wool of rugs that are older.

Beldi

Boucherouite #25 – $820

This Boucherouite rug hails from Morocco. Scraps of recycled substances have been pieced together to create colorful and energetic carpets that are sure to brighten any space.

Beldi

Red Azillal Berber Rug – $850

In the hills of Morocco, this antique berber rug is absolutely spectacular in deep hues of black and red.

Morris Etc..

The South Portland Rug 16

Vintage Peruvian rug layout looks amazing in contemporary and fresh colors such as pink, purple and ocean green. I think this rug could be ideal for a little one’s room.

Morris Etc..

The Bracken Ridge Rug 11 – $375

This Bracken Ridge rug is 100 percent wool, one-of-a-kind and made in Peru. It’s among my favorites in candy-colored hues of pink and orange.

L’aviva house

Moroccan wedding costume – $615

Antique wedding blankets were worn by Moroccan brides on their wedding day. They are now able to be used as blankets, as well as rugs, to bring a little sparkle to a room.

The Loaded Trunk

Vintage Tulu Rug – $549

Tulu rugs are Turkish shag carpeting. The variety of colors is magnificent; just one could create a rainbow effect in a neutral room.

The Loaded Trunk

Patchwork Kilim Rug – $299

A patchwork kilim rug from Turkey is a excellent way to bring both color and design home.

Anthropologie

Agadir Twists Rug – $498

I can’t get enough of the rug from Anthropologie. It has a mix of deep and electric hues that make it a complete statement piece.

L’aviva house

Shyrdak Felt Rugs

A rug from Kyrgyzstan is a way to add some global style. Each rug comes in many different colors and patterns so you can find the one perfect for your inside.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 4’2″x6’0″ – $999

This Pakistani rug was re-dyed in a beautiful purple. It’s a fantastic means to usher in some color in your home.

Amadi Carpets

Beni Ouarian Rug

The abstract pattern with this Moroccan rug has a free-form illustrative feel. It’s like a work of art to your floor.

Amadi Carpets

Turkey Vintage Kilim

This classic kilim was hand-knotted in Turkey. I am a lover of the orange and purple color palette.

Anthropologie

Tan-Tan Rug – $998

My sister just bought this Moroccan rug for the living space. It has so many colors it can be tricky to determine what sort of furniture to match it with. My suggestion would be to go with something black for a striking contrast.

ABC Carpet

Tabriz 4’8″ x 6’7″ – $5,999

I love the attention to detail present in Persian rugs. This one has so many incredible colors and patterns within it. It’s rugs such as this that truly stand out and warm up a modern inside.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 6’1″x8’9″ – $3,799

Black and emerald green never looked as lovely as they do within this over-dyed Pakistani rug. In a space with black furnishings, this rug is going to be the star.

Doris Leslie Blau

Eastern European Flat Weave Carpet – $58,000

Can you believe that this is an early 20th century carpeting? This Eastern European rug has a graffiti-like texture for this. I love the abstract imagery and bright colors. It’s simply fantastic!

Sheherazade

Moroccan Kilim

This Moroccan kilim in teal blue strikes my fancy. Made with a mix of cotton and silk, it would be lovely to stretch out as it is to look at.

Doris Leslie Blau

Samarkand Carpet – $28,000

This bright red rug is from East Turkestan. I love the floral theme.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 7’9″x9’9″ – $4,499

This pink Color Reform rug from ABC Carpet & Home would look amazing in a small girl’s room. Do not you agree?

Next: 20 Affordable Area Rugs

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