Check the Curves About This Cliffside Home

While overseeing the construction of their Gorge Amphitheater, winery owners Vince and Carol Bryan spent the majority of their time in their vineyard land in a string of mobile homes, after that in a prefabricated shed perched on the edge of their cavernous Columbia River Gorge. But two years of travel and experience gave them a very special inspiration that they finally put into play with the development of their own unique house.

Struck over the past few years by the beauty of curved, round shapes found in both nature and structure, the Bryans visualized a home that paid homage to all things around: arches, columns, circles, curves, spirals. Dismissing any requirement to adhere to one particular fashion, they instead made a home merged through the use of round types.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Vincent and Carol Bryan, founders of the Gorge Amphitheater and Cave B Estate Winery
Location: Close George, Washington, on the Columbia River Gorge
Size: two bedrooms, two bathrooms, home office, attic and detached carriage house

Kimberley Bryan

Back in 2000 that the Bryans took their two years of inspiration, drew it out and handed it to designer Dan Weller. “This was a superb collaboration between homeowner and designer,” Vince says. “We knew precisely what components we needed to work with: this incredible vista and stone. We knew we needed an expansive curved roof involving two fixed components, and rounded shapes instead of right angles. We loved what we’d seen in the Western missions, the Southwest, Italy and France, and we all wanted to not work with the environment we’ve got on this property, but you must be inspired by it as well.”

Kimberley Bryan

Wine grape growers since 1980, the Bryans knew an entry arbor are a must-have element. Weller designed the home “to walk down into the view,” Carol says. This intention begins outside, with a sloping walkway which brings guests gently to the house’s front door.

Kimberley Bryan

Their good friend’s son along with two vineyard employees assembled the cedar structure. Grapes and kiwi create a curvy, winding mass of plant life overhead. Basalt stone from the property constitutes the hand-built walkway.

Kimberley Bryan

Southwestern influences come through in numerous curved outlines. An arched window over double entry doors echoes a half-wagon-wheel arch over the arbor.

Kimberley Bryan

Built into the hill above the gorge, the rear of the house opens to grassed terraces which lead to the pool and yard.

Kimberley Bryan

“The outside columns were influenced by those we found in Bologna, Italy,” Vince says. “We were always struck with their beauty, as well as the beauty of the arch. This side of the house has just curves, no direct lines in any way.” Vince sketched ideas out and worked with a carpenter to arrive at the closing, three-tiered rounded form. “The carpenter spent a lot of time with his band saw, making distinct cuts arrive at the right, viable layout,” he says.

Wooden rafter tails are supposed to evoke sunlight beams radiating outward.

Kimberley Bryan

The couple installed an infinity pool inspired by one they found in Switzerland “to compete with the view as little as possible,” Carol says. “We knew it would supply that direct link to the river which we wanted.” The pool is among the few nonround layouts on the property. The couple felt that the rectangular shape was better for swimming laps.

Kimberley Bryan

Vince and Carol chosen to leave the vast majority of natural stone and sagebrush surrounding the house untouched.

The Bryans’ home design philosophy has been formed many years back when they were a young married couple researching the West Coast. Hearst Castle had a specific effect on them. “I had been struck by the simple fact that Hearst did not try for conventional continuity in his home,” Vince says. “He just created it with things he adored. I had never seen that before. That’s what we’ve achieved here. This home really reflects us.

Kimberley Bryan

“Voluminous space” was on peak of the couple’s record. Two whole Douglas fir logs out of Oregon support massive fir beams. “We really wanted a curved ceiling with no visual assistance,” says Vince. “But when we began building, we found we needed not only 1 service, but 2. I advised our designer that when we needed to put in another one, it would have to avoid impeding the area’s flow. That brought about the wrapping of the support column over the spiral stairs.”

The stained glass squares on the wall were inspired by Le Corbusier.

Kimberley Bryan

The majority of the main floor is one open space, with the entry, dining area, living area and kitchen flowing uninterrupted from 1 end of the home to another.

Kimberley Bryan

A jumble of large basalt boulders forms the nexus of the house. The pile once included a functioning fountain, but as the amount of toddlers grew, the water feature was forfeited for the sake of greater dining room. “All the grandchildren love it,” says Carol. “It’s constantly climbed all over when they are visiting.”

A large decorative sun sculpture from Amerex from Seattle is “a nod to the design of the house: the curved walls and the beams,” says Carol. “It also arouses the extreme sun we’ve got here in central Washington.”

Kimberley Bryan

Though many corners in the home are rounded, there remains lots of large, horizontal wall space to Vince and Carol’s art set. “What we do when we travel is visit art galleries,” Carol says. “Over the years we have collected a really diverse assortment of artwork; each slice has great personal meaning to us. We don’t care whether it is an original or a print. If it relates to our life or experiences somehow, it resonates loudly. The house has something of great meaning everywhere we look, which we adore.”

Against the rear wall, both the folding and sliding glass doors maintain steady during the gorge’s heavy winds.

Kimberley Bryan

“We first had to change the strategy to put in another floor,” Vince says. “Our designer did not initially include one. We’ve got a large family and needed bedroom space as well. He inquired how exactly we wanted to get it done, and I attracted an arch. He took that arch and made the attic we now have.”

Dozens of can lights dot the ceiling. Each segment is controlled individually to save energy prices and to supply targeted lighting. “We often turn off all of the lights except where we are reading, for instance,” Carol says. “In as large a room as this, that kind of light control has been invaluable.”

Kimberley Bryan

Cherry cabinets match the tones from the wood beams. The view from behind the stove is a very long one: The expanse of the room with a transparent perspective of the dining room and living room spaces makes it certain that the cooks stay in the conversation and part of the fun. “When we were growing up in the ’50s, the kitchens were totally cut off from the rest of the house,” says Carol.

Kimberley Bryan

Vince built these bookcases in the home office, in which Carol, shown here, functions.

Kimberley Bryan

The residence is tucked between hillside and cliff’s edge, so that its clay-tiled roof reveals over the stones and sagebrush.

See additional photographs of this home

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Antiques and Heirlooms Befit a 1778 Vermont Home

Artist and ceramicist Laura Zindel and her husband, Thor, fell in love with their dream house on line. The only problem: They lived 3,000 miles away in San Francisco. Nevertheless, they were in love with the historic 1778 house that they flew to Guilford, Vermont, to begin the lengthy process of its own owners. The previous owner had saved it from demolition in the 1970s, rebuilding it room by room on the weekends, also was not about to let it go to just anyone. “The construction was in great shape, but purchasing an older house is like painting the Golden Gate Bridge,” Laura says. “Start at one end, and from the time you are done, you return to the beginning and start over.”

The grand house has become part of their loved ones. “And just like a individual, we try to not judge its own defects and enjoy it for what it is,” says Laura. The first step in renovating the new member of their household was installing all-new electrical wiring, done by Thor, who’s skilled as an electrician, among many other trades. After that, they set about making the the majority of the home’s individuality.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Laura and Thorsten Zindel, and their son, Wulff
Location: Guilford, Vermont
Size: 3,500 square feet; 5 bedrooms, 1 bath
That’s interesting: This house sat to a 100-acre object of property.

Theresa Fine

A porch in the back of the house is the family’s favorite spot. Located just off the kitchen, the porch overlooks a large, manicured backyard. Thor reclaimed the home ceiling boards to reconstruct the porch’s flooring.

A big wood plank paired with black seats is decorated for the holidays using Laura’s ceramics, mercury glass and natural elements.

Pendant lighting: Ikea; framed artwork: Rick Jones

Theresa Fine

Is a royal-blue Amish-made hutch from Millbrook Farms Woodworks in Westmoreland, New Hampshire. It retains an array of original ceramics, made in house by Laura and her staff and decorated with art that ranges from birds to sea creatures.

Some of the jars and bottles were made using antique molds Laura has found. “My housewares are motivated by the Victorian cabinets of curiosity as well as the Arts and Crafts movement,” she says.

Theresa Fine

The formal entrance to the house was built sometime in the 1800s, as was all the house outside of the kitchen.

A sensed cent rug complements the bold blue paint in the hallway entrance. “I adore dark, saturated colours, which is a bit of a problem since our house doesn’t get a lot of light,” says Laura. “The blue in the hallway I believed was a great updated look for the house but was historically on stage.”

Paint: Naval 6244, Sherwin-Williams

Theresa Fine

A collection of portrait paintings by artist Nina Friday lines the stairway. The railing is the perfect spot for a holiday garland.

Theresa Fine

The master bedroom has gold elements to match the ebony furniture. Portraits of the men and women who lived in the house hang on every side of the mattress.

The wide pine floors, painted brown, and wallpapered walls are original to the house.

Cabinets: Coqo Floral Curtains, Natural, Anthropologie

Theresa Fine

This woodland-inspired bedding, including rabbits was part of an exclusive lineup by Patch NYC for Goal.

Theresa Fine

At the home office, painted brown trim is paired with apple-green wallpaper decorated in an English hunt club theme. A vintage globe sits on a long weathered teak desk.

Background: Lady of the Manor, Yukari Sweeney, Anthropologie

Theresa Fine

Among the two guest bedrooms upstairs has a neutral and green palette accented with pops of red. This vintage bamboo vanity chair, handed down to Laura from her aunt, was sanded a candy red.

Theresa Fine

The second guest bedroom has a much softer, more feminine palette, with painted white floors and pale pink trimming. A large, folksy felted area rug pulls the colours of this room together.

Paint: Quaint Peche 6330, Sherwin-Williams

Theresa Fine

A big antique cupboard, purchased at A Candle In The Night in Brattleboro, Vermont, displays Laura’s mother’s Depression-era quilt group.

Laura’s mother inspires her personal style the most. “She loved to collect antiques and had collections of everything from china to quilts,” Laura says. “I’ve inherited many of her treasures and also have them in our property. After we moved to Vermont from San Francisco, she explained that my style could change, and I didn’t believe her. But I discovered that if you reside in an old house, it has a voice that cannot be denied.”

Theresa Fine

A classic bureau stands out against white walls and floors, providing storage and a lovely vignette in the guest bedroom.

Theresa Fine

Another bit of artwork original to the house, a Victorian sampler, hangs above a nightstand that showcases additional vintage finds, such as a milk glass hobnail lamp perched atop an old whiskey box which once belonged to Laura’s father.

Theresa Fine

The rustic bed frame was created by Moose River Lake & Lodge Store in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. The chenille bedding is vintage.

Theresa Fine

A group of antique silver mercury glass ornaments hangs in the front windows to the holidays.

Theresa Fine

The formal entrance to the home is lit by an industrial window lighting first to the house.

Theresa Fine

“My 1778 home only feels great inside,” says Laura. “The whole house is made out of ancient wood, floor to ceiling. Maybe that’s something to do with it, or simply lots of joyful ghosts.”

A house this old includes some quirks of the past; for example, a little door used only for attracting coffins in and out. The house also offers an “Indian window” in the pantry, used for arrow strikes.

Theresa Fine

The family’s lawn can be home to well-cared-for pet hens.

Theresa Fine

Guilford is a little town near the historic town of Brattleboro. Laura’s new working studio, gallery and storefront, found here, is set in a thriving arts community.

Theresa Fine

Despite all of the treasures within, Laura (shown here) still says, “The most significant part house is my loved ones.”

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A Home Comes Alive With Day of the Dead Decor

Melissa Love Tristan and her family go out for Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead. At the end of every October, their Dallas home is awash in paper flowers, skulls, skeletons, sugared treats and Halloween decoration.

Melissa was introduced into Dia de los Muertos with her husband, Guillermo, whose family is originally from Mexico. This Mexican vacation comes right after Halloween — on November 1 to two — therefore the family unites the decor of both holidays in their merry, two-bedroom residence. “The civilization of remembering loved ones who’ve passed and celebrating them this way is indeed amazing,” she states.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Guillermo Tristan, Melissa Love Tristan, son Luca (age 4) and the spirits of previous generations
Size: 1,370 square feet; 3 bedrooms, two bathrooms
Location: Elmwood neighborhood of South Dallas

Sarah Greenman

Bright Mexican textiles, Fiestaware, candles and maracas set the mood. Tiny sombreros and paper flowers adorn the overhead lighting fixture.

Sarah Greenman

The Dia de los Muertos celebration focuses on food and family, which makes the dining room party central for the Tristan family. A pink hand-embroidered Otomi fabric hangs as a drape in the dining area.

Wall paint: Hearts of Palm, Sherwin-Williams

Sarah Greenman

Vignettes throughout the home honor the custom of producing little altars for family members that have passed away. “My decorating doctrine is, if it catches my eye and makes me grin, I need it around me,” says Melissa.

Sarah Greenman

Guillermo, a chef, typically spends his time preparing French cuisine at Boulevardier in Dallas. In the home that he keeps it easy with conventional dishes such as Dia de los Muertos. “If we are lucky his mama will make us some homemade tortillas,” says Melissa.

Sarah Greenman

Son Luca and his buddy Hudson shake maracas in expectation of candy bowls and kiddie mocktails being prepared in the kitchen.

Sarah Greenman

A vintage sideboard from an antiques mall in Gatesville, Texas, houses Melissa’s expansive group of sugared skulls, miniature coffins and skeletons dressed in formalwear.

Sarah Greenman

Melissa produced a spooky apothecary of doll parts, jarred innards and imitation fingers for her kitchen windowsill. “My taste leans towards the frightening and the bizarre,” she admits.

Sarah Greenman

An adult cocktail pub stands at the ready on a serving tray in the middle of the kitchen. This is only one of many small party stations Melissa has created throughout the home.

Sarah Greenman

A candy channel replete with lollies, candy corn and gummy pumpkins sits in the entrance to the kitchen. Melissa sets her extensive collection of glass jars and vintage containers to utilize during that season.

Sarah Greenman

“You can’t go out and buy your decorations at one time. Hunting and gathering is key for this type of party,” she states.

Sarah Greenman

Monster portraits, skulls and other spooky curios deck the living room. A classic trunk, found in Guillermo’s grandmother’s attic, serves as a coffee table. The sofas were a roadside discover that Melissa had reupholstered. “My key for finding furniture would be to follow along with the bulk trash signs,” she states.

Wall paint: Oyster Bay, Sherwin-Williams; rug: Ikea

Sarah Greenman

A Ouija board serves as a spooky coffee table tray, and a doll head onto a black candleholder keeps watch over the living room.

Sarah Greenman

Sarah Greenman

Luca and Hudson show their eyeball marbles during a holiday-themed card match.

No matter what the vacation, Melissa makes certain to generate a special place for kids from the living or family room which has a small dining table and chairs. “Kids should feel comfortable in their houses,” she states. “I also don’t need anything in our home which [Luca] can’t touch is afraid to be around.”

Sarah Greenman

Framed portraits of circus sideshow performers share space with doll parts under glass bell jars in a living room corner.

Sarah Greenman

Tall black and candles cat figurines flank the hearth. The vintage leather ottoman was a garage sale score. “Can you think I got that for $1?” asks Melissa.

Sarah Greenman

Is it a ghost, or is it Luca running throughout the living room on the way to his bedroom? A hand-me-down midcentury console from Melissa’s mother holds extra seasonal decoration. “I truly am inspired by lines, shapes, textures and anything from art deco to midcentury,” says Melissa.

Sarah Greenman

Publications, sturdy furniture and comic book paraphernalia fill Luca’s room. “The visual rule of eye level for kids is important,” says Melissa.

Sarah Greenman

Melissa put a great deal of thought to Luca’s bedroom. “I really wanted him to feel motivated in his room,” she states. “I think it’s important for kids to have a place in the home where they can have quiet time as well.”

Rug, artwork above bed: Ikea; pub cart: thrift store

Sarah Greenman

Melissa made certain that Luca’s favourite things are in his fingertips from the playroom. “His distance is a reflection of him. And there’s nothing better then wooden toys, Legos and musical instruments to fulfill a day of exploration and imagination,” she says.

Sarah Greenman

An extra shelf keeps small collector’s things from harm’s way.

Sarah Greenman

There aren’t any holiday decorations in the master bedroom, to keep its serene and quiet feel. “I love everything girly, but since I’m the only lady in my property, I want to make sure there’s a balance of masculine and feminine,” says Melissa.

Wall paint: Lemon Verbena and Hearts of Palm, Sherwin-Williams

Sarah Greenman

A group of vintage suitcases and one antique portable record player make up a tower in the master bedroom.

Sarah Greenman

This coated side porch was the house’s main selling point. “I love sitting out here when it rains or to watch Luca play in front yard,” says Melissa. “For me it’s about a sanctuary. It is my retreat from the rest of the world.”

Sarah Greenman

A skeleton sits inside a twig wreath and greets guests and trick-or-treaters since they approach the property’s entrance. The legs clack against the door when it opens and closes.

Sarah Greenman

The front yard explodes with Halloween decoration and autumnal cheer. The Tristan family’s 1920s cottage is dressed with hay bales, gourds, pumpkins, black spiders and smiling skeletons.

Sarah Greenman

Luca and his neighbor, 10-month-old Jacob, are in costume and ready for a night of trick-or-treating. Melissa smiles as she surveys her handiwork. “That is definitely my favourite time of year,” she states.

Prove us Do you celebrate Dia de los Muertos? Please share a photo below!

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Contemporary Four-Story Locate in San Francisco

After Amelia and Steve Hirsch heard a house renovated by architect John Maniscalco went on the market, they instantly jumped at the opportunity. The couple have always been attracted toward clean, contemporary design and had long admired Maniscalco’s work. They knew they couldn’t pass up a opportunity to own the house, which was created in 2003 from the esteemed architect, and so were pleased to bypass the hassle of going through a dull building process.

Amelia is a self explanatory interior decorator that specializes on producing clean, livable spaces. And Steve grew up with his mom, Barbara Hirsch, along with their exceptionally modern West Los Angeles house. With their combined backgrounds and interests, the couple created a contemporary, comfortable space satisfied to their family’s lifestyle.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Amelia and Steve Hirsch, along with their son Quincy
Location: Noe Valley neighborhood of San Francisco
Size: 3,100 square feet; 4 tales; 3 bedrooms, 3 baths
That is interesting: Quincy went to lecture with an architect’s kids.

Shannon Malone

The house originally had a much cooler colour palette, with white walls, blue glass and a metal staircase. Amelia and Steve added heat by painting yellow accent walls and design using earthy tones. “For us, the exterior inspires the interior,” says Amelia.

The home includes a very open floor plan, and Amelia says one of their main challenges was arranging the living room space within an kid-friendly manner which didn’t make it resemble a playroom. Built-in shelves keep things organized, furniture helps produce individual spaces with both purpose and character.

Couch: Room & Board; rug: one of a type from ABC Carpet & Home; yellowish side table: Propeller

Shannon Malone

As an interior decorator, Amelia finds it important to style with livability in mind. She also designed the space to be suitable for an energetic and growing 8-year-old son but to nevertheless meet the couple’s love of clean lines and clutter-free contemporary design.

Couch: Design Within Reach; paint: Cornbread, C2 Paint

Shannon Malone

The spacious floor plan is one of the couple’s favourite features of their house. They find the space more comfortable and social than houses painted by walls. Steve says he loves being able to sit down in one area and see all of the way to the other end of the home.

Leather chairs: B&B Italia

Shannon Malone

Locating a suitably scaled dining room table has been just another one of their design dilemmas. They went through three rectangular tables before Steve’s mother eventually recommended what was be the alternative: an oval-shaped table. The Saarinen table’s marble surface is custom created, and the table is paired with custom-upholstered Dune seats by ABC Carpet & Home.

Amelia created the banner hanging behind the table from wrapping paper for Thanksgiving dinner one year, and the family decided to keep it on the wall. “It’s how we wish to live,” says Amelia.

Shannon Malone

Shannon Malone

The slightly darker earthy hues in the kitchen, together with their kid’s art adorning the fridge, make for a warm and welcoming kitchen. The sleek kitchen cabinets are made from Anigre wood.

Rug: ABC Carpet & Home

Shannon Malone

Most walls have been painted with one of John Maniscalco’s favorite colors, White Dove by Benjamin Moore.

The couple purchased the cork vases from Palecek, and the mirror is from San Francisco Bay Area store Harvest Home.

Shannon Malone

The hardwood flooring throughout the house are jarrah wood. The couple admits the flooring can be high maintenance but consider the choice well worthwhile.

Shannon Malone

One of the couple’s favourite features of Maniscalco’s architecture is how he utilizes structure to manipulate light. The center of the house has no direct windows, but light comes in through the skylights shining in the top to bottom and bouncing off the walls.

Shannon Malone

A bright yellowish Tom Vac rocking chair by Ron Arad by a store in San Francisco adds cheerful colour to a staircase landing space and complements artwork by Amelia’s mother, JoAnn Hughes.

Shannon Malone

Warm, earthy tones and clean, contemporary design make for an attractive guest bedroom.

Painting: JoAnn Hughes; bed: Crate & Barrel

Shannon Malone

“Quincy gets the best room in the home,” jokes Amelia. The 8-year-old’s area is filled with sun, toys and kid-friendly art. Amelia advises parents to use large pieces of art like this print in children’s rooms. “It declutters the walls with just one large focal point, rather than various scattered bits, which can distract from the overall look of the space,” she states.

Bed: Custom upholstered from Room & Board; beanbag chair: Pottery Barn

Shannon Malone

One of Maniscalco’s signature design features is his use of storage. These built in units are observed throughout the house and are the best solution to the daily clutter of a busy household. “I enjoy wash, clutter-free spaces,” says Amelia.

Bed: Room & Board

Shannon Malone

“We feel as if we are on vacation once we are in our bedroom,” says the couple. With stunning views surrounding the master bedroom, both Amelia and Steve can relax and watch the sun rise and set.

Shannon Malone

Outside of the master bedroom is a small deck which overlooks San Francisco. “We love this city,” says Steve. “It has great outdoor spaces, and I love the accessibility. I walk to and from work every day.”

Amelia found this one-of-a type patio table at a neighborhood store.

Shannon Malone

The couple did not make any changes to the master bathroom. The gorgeous built-in storage unit and contemporary double sinks keep the space organized and relaxing.

Shannon Malone

Introducing art into the house was a method for the few to make the space their own. Though they are thrilled to be “done” with the home, they say that they would love to add more art.The painting hanging above the tub is just another unique piece by JoAnn Hughes.

Shannon Malone

The top attic floor of the house was originally supposed to be utilized as an office space, but the base floor became the office and gym, and this space was turned into a media room and playroom rather than A glass floor leads the way into the space, fully equipped with a flat-screen TV, a unique couch with detachable bits and Steve’s electric guitar. Additionally, it leads to an wonderful outdoor deck.

Shannon Malone

One of the major renovations was the construction of patios and decks. The few converted the original rooftop into a scenic wooden patio overlooking town and the bay, with glass siding to security.

Patio furniture: Room & Board

Shannon Malone

The downstairs space doubles as a home office and a gym. It leads to the deck.

Desks: Custom created by Room & Board

Shannon Malone

Amelia and Steve added the rear deck as another outdoor lounging space.

Furniture: Room & Board

Shannon Malone

The contemporaryrear exterior of the residence is an excellent representation of the aesthetic of Maniscalco. The original home was identical to their neighbor’s conventional San Francisco home but was remodeled by Maniscalco to give it a fresh, new look.

Shannon Malone

Front is much more conventional than most Maniscalco houses, but the few added the metal rail and larger street numbers “to give it a little advantage,” says Steve.

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Beadboard Panels Give a Shortcut to a Classic Style

Beadboard wainscoting has a classic look that never goes out of fashion. Conventional tongue and groove beadboard may be significant chore to put in, but you can get a similar appearance with beaded hardboard boards, and the practice is comparatively straightforward.

Beaded hardboard paneling is an engineered wood product, generally made from MDF (medium density fiberboard) or a ecofriendly hardboard, also comes in a number of finishes. My loved ones and I gave these panels a shot in our little bathroom for a classic decorative finish that will safeguard our bathroom walls from tear and wear.

Meg Padgett

We chose Georgia-Pacific’s True Bead ready-to-paint 4-by-8 foot panels. You can also find beadboard kits which include paneling, baseboard and chair rail trim, but we created a custom beadboard/board and batten treatment with Engineered timber, MDF and casing.

Note: Feel free to replace any all-wood material for MDF. Wood generally holds up better in a damp environment like a bathroom, although we’ve never noticed any issues with our MDF.

Meg Padgett

Tools and Stuff:

Beadboard MDF paneling (comes in 8-foot-wide sheets)
Grade and measuring tape
Chalk line
Construction adhesive (such as Liquid Nails)
11/2-inch finishing nails or brad nails
Hammer or finishing nail gun
Nail set
Jigsaw
Handsaw, table saw or circular saw
Miter saw or miter box/hand saw
1- by 6-inch primed whitewood
11/16-inch by 31/2-inch MDF (used for backer board)
1- by 2-inch primed whitewood
9/16- by two 1/2-inch MDF (used for battens)
3-inch decorative fiberboard casing
Paintable caulk (such as Dap 3.0) and a caulking gun
Semigloss interior paint

Meg Padgett

Ready the room for setup by carefully removing all baseboard trim so that it can be reused. Eliminate all socket and switch hardware and covers from the walls. Eliminate the toilet if needed. Leave any window trim.

If you would like to upgrade the wall paint, do this prior to setup. Paint the wall down into a couple inches lower than the beadboard’s finished height.

When choosing your panels, pay proper attention to the status of each panel and read the manufacturer’s directions on the back of the panel for proper setup.

Note: Like all wood products, fluctuations in temperature and humidity may lead to hardboard paneling to contract and expand slightly. Before installation, stand the panels long borders in the area for at least 48 hours in order that they can adapt to the existing room conditions.

Meg Padgett

Measure from the floor to a desired height (beadboard is usually installed 33 to 48 inches ) and add
⅛ inch to the height to allow for thermal growth. Mark your height and use a level and pencil or a chalk line to mark a line.

Meg Padgett

Cut your panels to height using a handsaw, table saw or circular saw. Cut the panels up if using a handsaw and confront if using power tools. Make a detailed guide for any cutouts, allowing for a 3/16-inch gap around window trim and a 1/16-inch gap when linking bits. Use a jigsaw to cut holes for sockets or detailed cuts, such as around windows. Be sure to follow the spacing pattern of the beads in the beadboard paneling when joining two pieces together.

Dry fit the paneling into the wall first and make any alterations necessary. Subsequently apply construction adhesive to the back of the plank about 1 inch around the outside edge and in a squiggly line layout in the middle. Put the panel in place and use shims to be sure the panel is level.

Hint: For cuts around sockets, draw around the socket with chalk or pencil. Place the back side of the panel against the wall and contrary to the socket. The chalk outline will move to the back of the panel, which makes you a guide on your cutout.

Meg Padgett

Firmly press on the paneling against the wall. While the glue is drying, fasten the paneling in place with a couple nails. I prefer using a finishing nail gun for fast and easy nailing. If you’re using a hammer, drill pilot holes for the finishing nails with a 1/16-inch drill bit first, to prevent damaging the board.

Meg Padgett

Once the paneling is in place, complete it with trim. Attach the 51/2-inch baseboard. Use a level and shims to make sure the board is level. Utilize a nailing gun or hammer and nails to secure the baseboard into position.

Meg Padgett

Next attach the backer board to the top of the beadboard, once more making sure the board is level. For corners use a miter saw or miter box to reduce 45-degree angles on the ends that match in the corner. You might also use the miter saw or box for a more finished look on the ends.

Meg Padgett

Install the vertical battens. The spacing of the battens is up to personal preference, but we placed ours roughly 13 inches apart.

Hint: It’s more important to make certain the battens run parallel with the beads in the beadboard than they are plumb. If you’re lucky and your walls are level and straight, you should be able to attain both.

Meg Padgett

Nail the casing into the backer board, making sure the shell is flush with the surface of the backer. As opposed to nailing into the cap of the MDF trim, which may lead to dividing, apply construction adhesive to fasten the remaining piece into position.

Meg Padgett

Together with the beadboard and trim in place, the wall treatment is ready for any finishing touches.

Meg Padgett

Apply white paintable sealant to any nail holes, gaps or places where trim meets trim. After the sealant has dried, paint with easy-to-clean semigloss paint.

Meg Padgett

This upgraded take on the classic beadboard wall treatment has been the perfect upgrade to give our little cabin bathroom some character that fits our house’s style.

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Rooms Delight at 2012 Kips Bay Decorator Show House

From the tranquil oasis of a blue, white and green living room into a “Black, White, and Red All Over” bedroom to a sofa with an indoor swing, Apartment 2102 in the Kips Bay Decorator Show House (one of 2 flats in the showcase) was full of surprises. Come on along as we begin our excursion in the warm and welcoming foyer.

See Apartment 2101

Rikki Snyder

Timothy Miller termed his design for the foyer of Apartment 2102 “Making an Entrance,” for obvious reasons, but also as this is his first time working with all the display home. He extended the foyer up the stairs to give people a feeling of flow and connection to the rest of the living spaces.

Rikki Snyder

To the right of the entrance, the Hudson River is visible via a wall of windows, also it had a direct influence on Susan Zises Green’s design for the living room. “The outside and the water motivated all of the color options,” she states. “And the light is intoxicating.”

Rikki Snyder

The living room flows into the dining room, which Patrik Lönn envisioned as a room for supper. He was motivated by the furniture designer Carl Malmsten.

The table is set with things from Hermès.

Rikki Snyder

James Rixner designed an open living room and kitchen area. He notes that the inspiration for his design began with the Nocturne area rug from Orley Shabahang. Greens — in the grass cloth and also the metallic-glazed linen draperies from Osborne and Little — are a soothing contrast with the white leather upholstery.

Rikki Snyder

The kitchen is totally open to the family room and includes a similar colour palette. The white counters connect to the adjoining room’s white leather upholstery.

Rikki Snyder

A door from the kitchen leads out to a 3,000-square-foot terrace, designed by Gunn Landscape Architecture and Vert Gardens, that has views looking south and west. “I really like the simplicity of this aesthetic of a boccie court, and in addition, it functions as a social and fun gathering spot,” says Alec Gunn.

Rikki Snyder

This writing room “is a painted fantasy,” states Chuck Fischer, who is an artist and muralist. It was motivated by the chinoiserie paintings of 19th-century artist and designer Jean-Baptiste Pillement. The 1950s lamp is out of Alan Moss.

Rikki Snyder

The window is framed by a trompe l’oeil valance that encircles a Hunter Douglas colour.

Rikki Snyder

The “Black, White, and Red All Over” bedroom, by Charles Pavarini, features butterflies that “signify the kids of the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club and their development as fully developed individuals flying out to the world.”

Bed: habit, Pavarini; bedside table lamps: Modulightor; mattress linens: habit, Casa del Bianco; mirror: Mirrors by Jordan

Rikki Snyder

A corner of Pavarini’s bedroom features a classic Valentine Sofa from actor-turned-interior-designer William Haines that is available through Profiles. The ebonized walnut dresser is from Craig Van Den Brulle.

Rikki Snyder

A eclectic wall composed of organic LEDs — it senses your body as you approach it is in the entry to Pavarini’s bedroom. “Lighting in the next decade is going to take a great twist,” he states. “There’ll likely be fabrics and wall coverings that are going to be lit. You will not be turning to a lamp; you will be turning to a lampshade.”

Rikki Snyder

A indoor swing having a view of the Hudson River is not something you see daily. Shawn Henderson definitely had some fun putting together this lounge.

The chaise is Henderson’s design.

Rikki Snyder

This “Extra Sensory Child’s Room” from Laura Bohn includes a space-saving unit out of Resource Furniture that converts from a desk into a twin mattress — ideal for a city apartment. The walls have been painted Bohn’s signature high-gloss chartreuse from Benjamin Moore.

Round shag rug: Edward Fields

Rikki Snyder

Upstairs the master bedroom has been designed by Etienne Coffinier and Ed Ku of Coffinier Ku Design. They have been motivated by a new collection of fabrics such as Missoni Home in Stark. The bed includes a headboard trimmed with white leather and a velvet Missoni Home chevron in the middle.

Over the mattress, Coffinier and Ku designed a piece of art “based on Japanese clouds, to give a feeling of peace as you get in bed,” Ku says.

Lamps: glass cylinders, Blanche Field

Rikki Snyder

This corner of the master bedroom includes armchairs designed by Coffinier and Ku that are upholstered in a striped Missoni fabric “that has a waterfall effect with the chair cushion,” notes the organization’s description. They also designed the high-gloss walnut and orange lacquer audio-visual cabinet.

“We played character,” Ku says. In addition to the clouds over the bed, there’s a sheep in the style of artist Francois Xavier Lalanne out of Demisch Danant and forged wooden mushrooms from Lars Bolander.

Rikki Snyder

Designer Alexander Doherty’s belief that real people live in real chambers was the jumping-off stage for his “Collector’s Bedroom.” He made the room for someone he’s known for years who is a collector of art by both English and American painters in the 1950s and ’60s.

Daybed: fabricated and upholstered by Zelaya Interiors; daybed cushions and linen/silk fabric: p Le Cuona; art: all from private collections

Rikki Snyder

“The Cabana,” by Scott Sanders, provides a refreshingly bright burst of colour. His choice of the grass-cloth covering on the walls is all about bringing the outside in. It’s Named Split Pea, and it’s by Philip Jeffries.

More eye-popping layouts in the event:
Two Apartments Enthrall in 2012 Kips Bay Show House

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Historical Modern Chicago Makeover

To get a neighborhood family with four kids, this 19th-century Queen Anne-style home in Chicago’s favorite Lincoln Park neighborhood was the perfect place to settle. A previous remodel had covered a lot of the original details with glitzy faux finishing, but the bones of their house were all beautiful.

The clients hired Jean Dufresne and his staff at SPACE Architects + Planners and inner designer Julia Edelmann of Buckingham Interiors to reveal historic detailing and give the home a sleek contemporary look. The result is a beautiful blend of traditional and modern styles that reflects the homeowners’ family-centric way of life. “They never wanted to’maintain’ or impress anyone,” says Dufresne. “It was all about family.”

SPACE Architects + Planners

The colours and materials were selected in a calm palette that will feel sophisticated but modern. The colours are muted but still pop out from the crisp white trim to draw attention to the unique period details.

Artistic light fixtures and the blank lines of mid-century furniture contrasts with the more conventional structure of the house for a unexpected and beautiful aesthetic. The unique chandelier is a vintage piece that Edelmann located from a demolished St. Louis Hotel.

Chairs: Vintage Italian, Sarlo
Table: Custom Design by Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID

SPACE Architects + Planners

This specific road in Lincoln Park has many older homes, very similar to this one. Some have been restored and a few have been split up into flats.

Throughout the remodel, Dufresne and his staff needed to look at the house’s neighbors and how near this house was to additional buildings. Dufresne created privacy screens on the second floor deck, adding tall fencing on the east side. Netting installed at the fencing keeps the children’s balls and toys from getting into neighbors’ yards.

SPACE Architects + Planners

Edelmann had worked for the couple before. “The homeowners prefer to keep things clean and glossy so that there’s not lots of fluff cluttering their home,” she says.

They kept the gorgeous original hardwood floors — a white walnut with an ebony and walnut stain. The unique light fixture at the entryway is constructed from molded corrugated cardboard.

Lighting fixture: Gray Pants at Seattle
Tile: Slate, Materials Marketing

SPACE Architects + Planners

An original stairway contributes to another levels of this home comprising five bedrooms and five and half baths.

Lucite console: CB2
Mirror: SGGrand

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

The living room has enough seating for the entire family, such as four vintage cherry-red leather chairs the clients owned and a little reupholstered sofa. A large bay window enables a clear perspective and tons of natural lighting.

Sofa: upholstered in Zinc cloth

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

Durable fabrics in neutral colours and a sparse layout helps to keep the room kid-friendly. “There are never a lot of bits in each room, so there’s play area. Those kids love to play together and have friends over all of the time,” says Edelmann.

Gray sectional: Custom layout Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID
Coffee table: Etsy
Rug: Atelier Lapchi

SPACE Architects + Planners

The whitewashed cabinet in the kitchen is a favourite piece. This find has a soft, beachy feel that was perfect to show the clients’ collection of pottery and sculpture. The rustic appearance contrasts with the sleek and modern kitchen.

This breakfast nook is a well-used region of the home. It has space for the kids to eat while morning light floods the room through big corner windows.

Chandelier: Robert Candelaria
Table: Crate & Barrel
Chairs: Lizz Chairs
Armoire: Jayson Home and Garden

Next: The kitchen before renovation

Before Photo

BEFORE: The initial kitchen felt far too little, had no flow and did not offer enough storage for the big family. Dufresne and his team opened the distance and enlarged the island and countertop.

The original home had numerous code violations, and also the team needed to go about fixing. Another exit was added to every degree, and many baths were reworked to get rid of awkward bumps and soffits

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER: The dark materials in the modern kitchen keep the room appearing clean, even if leftover crumbs litter the island countertop. The kitchen cabinetry is made out of wenge wood and charcoal grey acrylic.

Pendants: Vintage in Uber Modern, Chicago
Barstools: Design Within Reach
Countertop: Marble
Island countertop: Bitto Solid Surface

SPACE Architects + Planners

Dufresne loved designing the built-ins — especially the boys’ bunk beds. “The oldest boy wasn’t too happy to learn he would need to share a room with his little brother,” Dufresne says. “But he told me it was okay after he saw his new bunk bed! This made my day”

Bedding: Custom layout Julia Edelmann, Buckingham ID

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

The master bedroom performs the same grey tones in the rest of the home, however the grasscloth wallpaper adds a twist spin. The bedframe was repainted in gray grey, upgrading its traditional style.

Wall Treatment: Phillip Jeffries Grasscloth
Paint on mattress frame: Wall Street, C2 Paint

Buckingham Interiors + Design LLC

A little seating area at the conclusion of the room is the best spot to sit with a cup of coffee and a fantastic book on Sunday mornings. Dark wood shelving holds books and other collected bits and pieces for a built-in art screen.

Chairs: Vladimir Kagan
Chandelier: Vintage, Lincoln Antiques Mall

Next: A snapshot of this master bath before the renovation

Before Photo

BEFORE. Dufresne estimates this house was redone at some stage in the 1980s. When they first encountered this bathroom, it felt dark and restricted. All traces of the house’s original history was removed.

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER. The master bathroom is one of Dufresne’s favourite rooms in the house. “I love the freestanding bathtub — it is such a hot and tender shape,” he says. “The entire room is sun-drenched and calm.” The contrasting floor and ceiling tiles at the walk-in steam shower add depth and dimension to the otherwise all-white area.

Floor tile: Calacatta Oro, Materials Marketing
Inlet floor tile: Vintage Glass Winter Sky Luster, Walker Zanger
Wall tile: Calacatta Oro
Bathtub: Duravit

Before Photo

BEFORE. Before renovation, the back side of the house still had a more conventional appearance, and did not have quite enough outside space for your household.

SPACE Architects + Planners

AFTER. Dufrense and his team had a good deal of fun refinishing the exterior and designing the rear addition of the house. The contrast between the modern back and the historic front is the best instance of the client’s unique style. A garage on one side of this construction creates a barrier between the house and an alleyway, making a natural exterior spot for the children to play.

Photography by Eric Hausman

More Tours:
A Brooklyn Landmark Returns to Glory

Brooklyn Townhouse Full of Light

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Updated Federal Style at Massachusetts

This brick-front Federal-style dwelling built in 1789 unites the quintessential elegance of a classic home with modern upgrades in a charming country setting. An addition and renovations during Jillian and Tom’s house a good example of successful compromise, combining modern and classic styles while following the city’s strict historic architectural principles.

The home is in the heart of the historic district of Lincoln, Mass., about 20 minutes from Boston. The household of three started the one-year renovation procedure with a desire to make a real indoor-outdoor relationship with surrounding pastoral and conservation land. Their architect, Carol Marsh of Helios Design Group, states, “It was a fantastic puzzle to marry the historic aesthetics of the outside with the customer’s desire for a contemporary interior.”

at a Glance
Who lives here: Tom, Jillian, their tween daughter and two black Labrador retrievers Pudgie and Louie
Location: Lincoln, Massachusetts
Size: 5,200 square feet; 4 bedrooms, two offices, 5 baths and 4 fireplaces
Architects: Carol Marsh and Chris Hosford of Helios Design Group
Contractor: Kevin Cradock of Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

The big, open kitchen/family room addition at the rear of the house looks through a wall of windows onto two acres of lush property. Throughout the house, windows have been added and rooms created to take advantage of the views.

The kitchen has been where the side and main entrance foyer is now. The Caesarstone quartz countertop is 10.5 feet long by 8 feet deep at the deepest point. The curved form and graduated dimensions is reminiscent of the 1950s; Jillian calls it “the grand piano.” The custom-made cabinets are curled maple and the moldings are fir. For durability, Sant Agostino Travertino Avorio 12 inch-by-24-inch porcelain tile has been chosen for the family room and kitchen flooring.

Appliances: Electrolux Icon oven, Thermador 5 burner cooktop
Sconce lighting: Zaneen Dau out of Nina’s Lighting
Island chandelier: Harco-Loor Tiara out of Chimera Lighting
Cabinetry: Kevin Cradock Woodworking
Tile floor: Roma Tile in Watertown, MA

Windows: Loewen
Paint: Benjamin Moore, Pearl;
Benjamin Moore, Sweet Butter

Mary Prince Photography

Architect Marsh stands in the remodeled kitchen with Pudgie. The kitchen opens into the family room on the right, and 2 bedrooms and a deck are located just outside this field. The new area added about 650 square feet to the home.

Mary Prince Photography

The principal entrance is on the side of the house and opens into a large foyer. The entryway floors is Southern yellow pine and stained to match the antique pine elsewhere.

Mary Prince Photography

Here is the view in the kitchen/family space to the principal entrance. The door on the left leads to a patio, the second to a complete bath and the next to a mudroom.

Mary Prince Photography

This tub off the foyer sits at which there was once a family room on top of a brick patio. The counter is cut from Bubinga African Rosewood tree, along with the mirror frame is made of the excess wood. Both were designed to link the house to the outside.

Countertop: Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

This staircase and window, painted in high gloss white, replaced a dark, narrow-walled staircase accessible from the kitchen.

The Bocci pendant chandelier, such as most of those light fixtures in the home, is a reflection of Jillian’s preference for contemporary design components.

Mary Prince Photography

The kitchen opens into a Queen Anne-style dining room added in 1900 full with a fireplace, window seat and built in china cabinets.

Mary Prince Photography

The dining room sconces are Agatha by Hèmèra. The built in china cabinets on both sides of the doors into the kitchen have been reduced in depth to make extra space for kitchen drawers.

Jillian’s grandma’s black walnut dining room table is paired with chairs by Thos. Moser. The breakfront was purchased on Craigslist. Original sliding glass and wood pocket doors into the left lead into the living room.

Paint: Benjamin Moore, Sweet Pink C2
Lighting: Chimera
Chairs: Thos. Moser

Mary Prince Photography

This hall in the kitchen into the front door comes alive with an oil painting by Sandy Belock-Phippen. Tom’s office is on the right via original double wood doors. The room entrance is on the left.

Mary Prince Photography

A butler’s pantry with a half bath is at the end of the hall.

Cabinets: Kevin Cradock Woodworking

Mary Prince Photography

Tom’s office will be on the left and the room is on the right of the entrance staircase.

Mary Prince Photography

The first front door faces the front lawn and yard.

Mary Prince Photography

Paint: Benjamin Moore Constellation Aura Paint in Pearl

Mary Prince Photography

The first living room is directly across from Tom’s workplace and is the point where the family watches television.

Pudgie rests in Tom’s office. In the front of the fireplace is driftwood out of Martha’s Vineyard. The contemporary leaf motif on the drapes pay tribute to character.

Paint: Sweet Steak by Benjamin Moore

Mary Prince Photography

Jillian’s office/studio is filled with light and stunning views of the Lincoln Center Historic District. The late 1970s teak Danish desk, the easel and the Italian leather swivel chairs in tomato red make this space a relaxing retreat for painting, work and research.

Ban seats: Calia Italia
Drawers: Ikea

Mary Prince Photography

A late addition to the house from the 1970s, the master bedroom features excellent views of the backyard and side. This chamber is serenely supplied with little more than a bed, side tables, a television and a rug on the fir wood flooring. The bright blue walls as well as the perspectives outside the large windows create visual effect. A single first painting hangs on the wall. Just beyond the door is a big walk-in cupboard with skylights and a window.

Paint: English Lavender by Benjamin Moore
Windows: Pella Architect Series

Mary Prince Photography

The homeowners enjoy lounging in the big soaking tub and appreciating the view outdoors. Helios Design set designed the oversize shower and custom cabinetry. The 12-inch-by-12-inch floor tiles are Glassos and therefore are slip-resistant. Rosewood veneer cabinets provide plenty of storage and comprise big pullouts on both sides of the shower.

Cabinetry: Kevin Cradock Woodworking
Tile dloor: Roma Tile in Watertown, MA
Tub surround and vanity counter: Caesar Stone
Shower tile: Sicis Zinnia 3 tile out of Ideal Tile

Mary Prince Photography

This original second floor bedroom is located at the front of the house and includes a fireplace mantel with first pine molding. The dolls, a recent gift from a relative, create an eye catching display.

Paint: Van Alen Green by Benjamin Moore Historic Collection

Mary Prince Photography

A hallway bath is done entirely in travertine tile with a cherry wood vanity. It’s a large glassed-in shower stall. A big window flooding the space with natural light, providing scenic views of the outside.

Vanity: Exeter Cabinet Company, 12 Kingston Rd, Exeter, NH 03833, -LRB-603-RRB- 778-8113
Tile: United Tile America
Faucet: Grohe
Trim paint: Cloud whitened by Benjamin Moore

Mary Prince Photography

The daughter’s room, dubbed “The Princess Room,” combines the old with the new. The classic six-board torso was a Craigslist find; along with the wallpaper mural came from muralsyourway.com.

Furniture (Desk, Bureau, Side tables): Ikea Malm
Mural: Murals Your Way
Paint: C2 in Kiwi
Furry bean bag chair: Pottery Barn Teen

Mary Prince Photography

The view in the road of this historic 1789 brick front Federal home belies the contemporary components within.

Helios Design Group

It is possible to see the outside of the contemporary, 650-square foot addition on the rear of the home.

Helios Design Group

More:
Nostalgic Family Home in Upstate New York
A Home Full of History and Surprise
Northwest Home with a Mountain View

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Guest Picks: 20 Rugs from Around the World

Cabinets can perform more than warm up the flooring of your inside; they can be a cultural statement as well. Through unique rugs, you can be transported from Morocco into the Orient with only 1 step. Here are some amazing rugs from all over the globe that are sure to assist you bring color, pattern and ethnic style to your house. — Jeanine from AphroChic

Amadi Carpets

Re-Woven Turkish Rug

You can opt for big pops of color with this up-cycled Turkish flooring covering. The coolest part is that it is made from the re-dyed wool of rugs that are older.

Beldi

Boucherouite #25 – $820

This Boucherouite rug hails from Morocco. Scraps of recycled substances have been pieced together to create colorful and energetic carpets that are sure to brighten any space.

Beldi

Red Azillal Berber Rug – $850

In the hills of Morocco, this antique berber rug is absolutely spectacular in deep hues of black and red.

Morris Etc..

The South Portland Rug 16

Vintage Peruvian rug layout looks amazing in contemporary and fresh colors such as pink, purple and ocean green. I think this rug could be ideal for a little one’s room.

Morris Etc..

The Bracken Ridge Rug 11 – $375

This Bracken Ridge rug is 100 percent wool, one-of-a-kind and made in Peru. It’s among my favorites in candy-colored hues of pink and orange.

L’aviva house

Moroccan wedding costume – $615

Antique wedding blankets were worn by Moroccan brides on their wedding day. They are now able to be used as blankets, as well as rugs, to bring a little sparkle to a room.

The Loaded Trunk

Vintage Tulu Rug – $549

Tulu rugs are Turkish shag carpeting. The variety of colors is magnificent; just one could create a rainbow effect in a neutral room.

The Loaded Trunk

Patchwork Kilim Rug – $299

A patchwork kilim rug from Turkey is a excellent way to bring both color and design home.

Anthropologie

Agadir Twists Rug – $498

I can’t get enough of the rug from Anthropologie. It has a mix of deep and electric hues that make it a complete statement piece.

L’aviva house

Shyrdak Felt Rugs

A rug from Kyrgyzstan is a way to add some global style. Each rug comes in many different colors and patterns so you can find the one perfect for your inside.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 4’2″x6’0″ – $999

This Pakistani rug was re-dyed in a beautiful purple. It’s a fantastic means to usher in some color in your home.

Amadi Carpets

Beni Ouarian Rug

The abstract pattern with this Moroccan rug has a free-form illustrative feel. It’s like a work of art to your floor.

Amadi Carpets

Turkey Vintage Kilim

This classic kilim was hand-knotted in Turkey. I am a lover of the orange and purple color palette.

Anthropologie

Tan-Tan Rug – $998

My sister just bought this Moroccan rug for the living space. It has so many colors it can be tricky to determine what sort of furniture to match it with. My suggestion would be to go with something black for a striking contrast.

ABC Carpet

Tabriz 4’8″ x 6’7″ – $5,999

I love the attention to detail present in Persian rugs. This one has so many incredible colors and patterns within it. It’s rugs such as this that truly stand out and warm up a modern inside.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 6’1″x8’9″ – $3,799

Black and emerald green never looked as lovely as they do within this over-dyed Pakistani rug. In a space with black furnishings, this rug is going to be the star.

Doris Leslie Blau

Eastern European Flat Weave Carpet – $58,000

Can you believe that this is an early 20th century carpeting? This Eastern European rug has a graffiti-like texture for this. I love the abstract imagery and bright colors. It’s simply fantastic!

Sheherazade

Moroccan Kilim

This Moroccan kilim in teal blue strikes my fancy. Made with a mix of cotton and silk, it would be lovely to stretch out as it is to look at.

Doris Leslie Blau

Samarkand Carpet – $28,000

This bright red rug is from East Turkestan. I love the floral theme.

ABC Carpet

Color Reform 7’9″x9’9″ – $4,499

This pink Color Reform rug from ABC Carpet & Home would look amazing in a small girl’s room. Do not you agree?

Next: 20 Affordable Area Rugs

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