Houzz Tour: Stunning SoHo Loft

This stunning loft in SoHo had several lifetimes before a few hired architect and interior designer David Howell to finish a significant renovation. “This was a first SoHo loft building, transformed out of a mill back in the 1980s” explains Howell. The scope of his job included adding central air conditioning, a bathroom, a kitchen and windows in addition to improving the flow and layout.

“It was one huge open space together with all the original tin ceilings, floors and brick walls, exposed columns and sprinklers — all signatures of a classic SoHo loft,” describes Howell. Maintaining and enhancing these classic attributes was paramount throughout the renovation of the space, so he did not want to shut it with rooms or corridors. “Keeping things open is critical to a attic setting,” he explains. However, he did want to design a pleasing flow, and “create regions where folks want to go” within the space. See the way he balanced these priorities for his clients, a few who did not mind working within their home over a long period of time.

David Howell Design

One quite inviting part of the space is that this seating area; Howell brought in a careful mixture of textures and materials. The bench is a heavy, strong piece of carved weathered sandstone from Karkula, that was brought in through the windows via a crane. A mixture of soft rugs, vintage Poul Kjærholm seats, a couch from BDDW, a custom coffee table that comprises a rack of vintage bowling balls, and an woven seat from North Africa round out the space. One of the owners used to reside in Africa, so the seat is a link to a faraway location that was home.

“The massive picture finishes the fourth side of the living room,” says Howell. The woman in the film is really a digital production by Diago Uchitel and was bought at Ralph Pucci.

David Howell Design

The original tin ceiling was one classic SoHo loft feature that was restored and displayed off to the fullest. The attic only has one wall of windows to provide natural light, so 9-foot walls that don’t achieve all of the way up into the ceiling permit light to pass through the house and offer a continuous view of the ceiling. Uplights on top of these walls create reflections drawing attention to it.

David Howell Design

A blue bookcase adds room for books and items. It also supplies more lighting within it and atop it, and conceals the cargo elevator.

David Howell Design

A mural that is in advance stands up to the massive wall in the end of the dining room. Track lighting was installed to glow on this wall. “I chose the series light fixture over the dining table since it did not compete with the mural,” explains Howell. The fixture also works nicely with the existing exposed sprinklers, and fresh metal finishes brought in via the track lights and some of the furniture.

David Howell Design

Along with the bench, the custom made table needed to be brought in via crane. It’s 15 feet long and took 8 months to create. It had been worth the wait ; in actuality, when Bono happened to see it at the showroom, he tried to buy it, then wound up ordering up one twice as long for his own home.

The Danish dining seats are vintage 1960s rosewood that has been ebonized. “These are so well-crafted; both the legs and back are all 1 piece,” explains Howell. “They tie in quite nicely with the live border.”

Table by BDDW

David Howell Design

The brand new kitchen is tucked out of view in front doorway, in a place in which a guest bathroom was. It doesn’t have a good deal of daily usage, as a frequent element of life in a classic SoHo loft is taking advantage of all of the great takeout available. This opened up the chance to show more artwork and light it accordingly. Photography topics include Madonna and Grace Jones.

The counter stools tuck neatly underneath the island. Crafted out of a leather conveyor belt and steel by Jim Zivic, they increase the attic’s palette of textures.

David Howell Design

A cozy office/guest room occupies the space in the opposite end of the attic. The custom couch converts to a bed. The mild hanging overhead is a vintage extendable Italian lamp in the 1950s, and the seat is a vintage Eames Executive Chair, upholstered in red patent leather.

David Howell Design

This desk was created with a live-edge piece of wood left over in the dining room table. It had been filled in with bronze, and if you look carefully you can see the beautiful distressed features.

The shelf system was also made by Jim Zivic, also such as the counter stools, it is crafted of steel and leather. The materials selected here help link this room into the more public regions of the attic.

David Howell Design

For the master bedroom, a leather and walnut headboard out of BDDW stands up to the scale of the room. Paint color and a wooden walnut veneer wallpaper by Trove achieve the exact same height as the walls. The color palette and light fixtures give the room a relaxed and soft feel.

Red throw by Michelle Reeves, bought at ABC Carpet and Home

David Howell Design

An iconic newspaper chandelier by Inge Maurer plus a concealed coved lighting system illuminate this uncommon closed-off space, the master bath. A glass shower and a soft color palette keep things light and open, even though a well-worn red rug and red towels include dashes of color.

Block sinks by Agape, bought at Moss

David Howell Design

The tiles around the room are limestone, chosen to match the poured concrete floor. “We alternated the sheets to create a subtle checkerboard effect,” says Howell. Photography is included by A parallel shelf of artwork by a Damien Hirst skull and Helmut Newton. The dark frames and shelf play the 3-legged Jonah Meyer dining stool.

The preserved loft elements, consideration of usage, views and flow, masterful lighting scheme and careful mix of textures have resulted in a truly stunning residence.

More:
Regional Modern: Vibrant Length of Old and New at NYC
Tribeca Through and Through
5 Extraordinary Lofts Throughout the Country

See related

Copyright h o m e s t a y b e i j i n g 2 0 0 8 2018