Just Add Water: Rain Barrel Magic

Harvesting rainwater is an old idea that is gaining more adherents as water issues impact more and more of us. It is a practical strategy — you collect the water which would otherwise drain off your roof and use it to water your garden. The one disadvantage has always been seems. Most rain barrels were plastic containers which didn’t add much to the general landscape, a consideration that has been made even more obvious from the fact that their place, in the end of a rain or gutter series, made them a notable garden feature.

Times have changed, since the rain barrels showcased here prove. With a little work and creativity, you may have a rain barrel that fits your style and can be a standout in your backyard layout.

Chitra Vishwanath

Show it off. This rain chain/stone barrel combination doubles as a element in the backyard. In fact, you need to appear carefully to comprehend its function.

The use of strands of carefully spaced, thin galvanized iron chains is also an intriguing variation on the prevalent and bigger chains while the colors of the rock and metal mix seamlessly with the property’s exterior paint and trim.

AMS Landscape Design Studios, Inc..

On a similar vein, consider turning a fountain into a rain barrel. The scrollwork spigot might easily be attached to a downspout and you might put in a hose end to the base of the pot. Hidden pipework is an cost but worthwhile to the look.

Calico Studio

The sleek lines of this metal container would be too primitive for many houses, but they work perfectly with this contemporary style. It is evidence that a rain barrel needn’t be hidden.

Gardens from Gabriel, Inc..

Blend it in. If you would rather your barrel mix in, tuck it into the corner and encircle it with soft plantings. Repeating the terra cotta components in the rest of the space provides design continuity.

Burris & Associates, LLC

Cladding your storage tank in the exact same siding as the wall it stays against lets it fade into the background.

Woodmeister Master Builders

A wooden barrel is, of course, the greatest rain barrel. Luckily, it fits well with several house and garden designs, such as traditional, cottage and ranch houses.

Native Edge Landscape

Experiment with the look. At first sight, this rain barrel makes its presence known since it perches on its custom wooden stand. Though the mix of materials may seem like it would clash, it works well with the surrounding stone and wood facade of the house, architectural plantings and ground cover.

Envision Landscape Studio Inc..

This large galvanized container would seem to be an odd choice for this natural garden. It turns out that the lavish use of rocks grounds it instead. It is observable, but not as awkward as it might be in a more traditional space.

S2 Design

Add more performance. Water storage and irrigation are all combined in this modern spin on classic rainwater storage. Rather than conceal the workings, the storage unit and habit overflow tank are part of the general terrace design.

2fORM Architecture

A similar, though slightly bigger scale, includes a rain chain leading to the planter and also a bigger gutter in the backdrop draining to the bigger cistern outside it, which sits back far enough not to overwhelm the space directly outside the door.

Eggleston Farkas Architects

If industrial is the style, forget the wood barrels and go out with metal and concrete. The pipe look, rather than an open gutter, strengthens the theme and the concrete blends with the home’s siding.

B. Jane Gardens

Go large. If you live where rainfall is plentiful, you needn’t be limited by size. Sure, all these cisterns are large. But rather than attempt to hide them, embrace them as part of the landscape.

Thanks to the greenery along with the painted wall near this traditional cistern almost, but not quite, hides in plain sight. The weathered wood is another way to help this mix into the area, even if it is as tall as the house.

Fivedot

Or, simply place your rain water storage system front and centre. Yes, these are extremely large, but the contemporary home design may hold its own against them.

Johnston Design Group

Add your own touch. Nestle your barrel into a bed or rocks and grow vines around it for a natural look.

Rain Barrel Artist

Or move daring. In case you don’t want to disguise your rain barrel, make it stand out. Who wouldn’t enjoy this frog?

Rain Barrel Artist

Or surfing scene?

Rain Barrel Artist

Or glorious peacock?

There are not any rules. Only ideas.

More: Protect a Precious Resource Having a Rain Garden

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Copyright h o m e s t a y b e i j i n g 2 0 0 8 2019